rawjeev's techposts

Apr 13

p-dpa:

Transcribing the Manifesto of the Communist Party, Parasitic Ventures Press (2014)

The 1888 English edition of The Manifesto of the Communist Party, as written by Karl Marx and Frederick Engels and translated into English by Samuel Moore. 
This version has been transcribed by the staff of Parasitic Ventures Press in March of 2014 using Time Based Text, a java-script application which records the performance time of written texts. See http://tbt.dyne.org/ for more information on TBT.

See also: 
TBT :: Time Based Text, Jaromil (2006)
Tracking Letters_, John Caserta (2004)

p-dpa:

Transcribing the Manifesto of the Communist Party, Parasitic Ventures Press (2014)

The 1888 English edition of The Manifesto of the Communist Party, as written by Karl Marx and Frederick Engels and translated into English by Samuel Moore. 

This version has been transcribed by the staff of Parasitic Ventures Press in March of 2014 using Time Based Text, a java-script application which records the performance time of written texts. See http://tbt.dyne.org/ for more information on TBT.

See also: 

(via notational)

Apr 07

“Rather than simply seeing these behaviors as a series of exploits or hacks, I see them as signals of a changing posture towards computational systems. Culturally, we are now familiar enough with computational logic that we can conceive of the computer as a subject, an actor with a controlled set of perceptions and decision processes. And so we are beginning to create relationships where we form mental models of the system’s subjective experience and we respond to that in various ways. Rather than seeing those systems as tools, or servants, or invisible masters, we have begun to understand them as empowered actors in a flat ontology of people, devices, software, and data, where our voice is one signal in a complex network of operations. And we are not at the center of this network. Sensing and computational algorithms are continuously running in the background of our lives. We tap into them as needed, but they are not there purely in service of the end user, but also in service of corporate goals, group needs, civic order, black markets, advertising, and more. People are becoming human nodes on a heterogeneous, ubiquitous and distributed network. This fundamentally changes our relationship with technology and information.” — In the Loop: Designing Conversations With Algorithms | superflux (via new-aesthetic)

(via notational)

AmazonDash Aims To Make Shopping From Home Even Easier
The device lets you scan barcodes and order new products with voice commands to re-up your AmazonFresh queue. Read more>

AmazonDash Aims To Make Shopping From Home Even Easier

The device lets you scan barcodes and order new products with voice commands to re-up your AmazonFresh queue. Read more>

(via notational)

Apr 03

“Bad design makes it out into the World not through malicious intent but through no intent at all.” — LukeW | An Event Apart: How Designers Destroyed the World (via soxiam)

(via notational)

Mar 21

“According to Kay’s proposal made in the 1970s, we should think of the digital computer as a metamedium containing all the different “already existing and non-yet-invented media.” What does this imply for the aesthetics of digital projects? In my view, it does not imply that the different media necessarily fuse together, or make up a new single hybrid, or result in “multimedia,” “intermedia,” “convergence,” or a totalizing Gesamtskunstwerk. As I have argued, rather than collapsing into a single entity, different media (i.e., different techniques, data formats, data sources, and working methods) start interacting, producing a large number of hybrids, or new “media species.” In other words, just as in biological evolution, media evolution in a software era leads to differentiation and increased diversity—more species rather than less.” — Manovich, Lev. Software Takes Command: Extending the Language of New Media. New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2013. (via carvalhais)

(via notational)

Mar 16

thenewcomplete:

Joseph Heller’s outline for Catch-22.
Damn, the creative process is astonishing.

thenewcomplete:

Joseph Heller’s outline for Catch-22.

Damn, the creative process is astonishing.

(via boudu)

Mar 13

“If you asked people in 1989 what they needed to make their life better, it was unlikely that they would have said that a decentralized network of information nodes that are linked using hypertext.” — If you asked people in 1989… | chris dixon’s blog (via everythingisdisrupted)

(via notational)

Mar 12

“As the Web enters its next quarter century, we urgently need even more data to inform the current debate on what it will take to enhance and defend the Web. The Web community – and the world at large – are wrestling with tough issues around security, surveillance, privacy, open infrastructure, net neutrality, content protection, and more. These global decisions must be made based on the best possible information.” — Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web, gives us a statement on the 25th anniversary of the Web. (via pewinternet)

Mar 04

Brad Burnham On Iceland, Economic Development, and Networks – AVC -

cloudofdata:

Fred Wilson’s blog post pointed me to this video of his partner, Brad Burnham.

He’s talking about opportunities for Iceland, and that’s interesting… but a lot of what he says is relevant to other small and nimble countries (Scotland?), and even to the lumbering incumbents…

Worth a watch…

[video]

saschalily:

spoony:

Biostamp temporary tattoo wearable electronic circuits by MC10


x

saschalily:

spoony:

Biostamp temporary tattoo wearable electronic circuits by MC10

x

(via reckon)

Feb 26

RT @Geewiz: “Any sufficiently advanced incompetence is indistinguishable from malice.” — Elizabeth Mattijsen

— Tom Raftery (@TomRaftery) February 26, 2014
” — (via stoweboyd)

Feb 24

brandx:

mothernaturenetwork:

12-year-old invents Braille printer using Lego setThe Braigo printer cost its inventor about $350, making it more affordable than other Braille printers that can retail for more than $2,000.

And because I seriously side-eye this Western journalism trend of never crediting and NAMING the actual inventors in the headlines (especially when they’re young POC)
this inventor’s name is Shubham Banerjee, and he is making his glorious design completely open source, publishing it online FREE of charge! Just remember this kid’s name before some crusty old white dude “innovates” his design and takes all the credit.

brandx:

mothernaturenetwork:

12-year-old invents Braille printer using Lego set
The Braigo printer cost its inventor about $350, making it more affordable than other Braille printers that can retail for more than $2,000.

And because I seriously side-eye this Western journalism trend of never crediting and NAMING the actual inventors in the headlines (especially when they’re young POC)

this inventor’s name is Shubham Banerjee, and he is making his glorious design completely open source, publishing it online FREE of charge! Just remember this kid’s name before some crusty old white dude “innovates” his design and takes all the credit.

(Source: mothernaturenetwork, via notational)

Feb 19

Kimono will “API-ify” the web, apparently -

cloudofdata:

Another take on a problem area that existing companies like import.io and scraperwiki also tackle.

Each of these companies is approaching the challenge of turning web content into addressable/ programmable/ computable data from a slightly different direction, and each is probably aimed at a different community of adopters and users.

It’s still not clear which market opportunity is going to be largest… or most defensibly sustainable moving forwards…

Feb 09

“A Berlin-based conceptual artist , Aram Bartholl, has published a website to assist the craft-inclined and surveillance-averse in the making of their own Faraday cage pouch for their cellular telephones. The site’s launch followed a live, participatory event Bartholl staged at Hamburg’s Chaos Communication Congress in late December 2013. Such pouches have long been prized for their ability to restrict the transmission of electromagnetic waves, limiting both active-transmission devices, like cell phones, and inhibiting passive connections to RFID units embedded in devices or documents like passports. The material Bartholl instructs his participants to use is ”a copper or silver coated cloth or fleece especially developed for electromagnetic protection.”” — Kill Your Phone: Artist Targets Surveillance (via notational)

(via notational)